From Defeat to Landslide Loss: A Seat-level Model of the 2011 NSW Election

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Abstract

The 2011 NSW election produced the largest two-party swing in recent Australian election history, ending 16 years of Labor government. It raises the prospect of the end of Labor's dominance of NSW politics. This paper focuses on the consequences of ALP instability for the Party's electoral opportunities and strategy in the lead-up to its 2011 defeat. The authors single out the mass departure of Labor MPs prior to the election and the loss of Greens preferences as interesting problems for empirical analysis. They explore both loss of incumbency and preference effects in a seat-level (n = 93) regression model and comment on the significance of the findings for NSW Labor.

LanguageEnglish
Pages285-293
Number of pages9
JournalAustralian Journal of Political Science
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

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From Defeat to Landslide Loss : A Seat-level Model of the 2011 NSW Election. / Wilson, Shaun; Spies-Butcher, Ben.

In: Australian Journal of Political Science, Vol. 47, No. 2, 06.2012, p. 285-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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