From modern to post-modern? Contemporary ethnic residential segregation in four US metropolitan areas

M. Poulsen, J. Forrest, R. Johnston*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent articles by Dear and Flusty, Logan, Marcuse and Nijmann have initiated a debate regarding the characteristics of modern and post-modern urbanism. One of the differences between the two, it is contended, is in their residential geographies: post-modern cities, it is argued, are more heterogeneous and fragmented than modern cities, which are characterized by extreme segregation of ethnic groups into citadels (the host society) and enclaves/ghettos (all other groups). Testing these ideas empirically requires a methodology which allows rigorous comparisons over space and time. This article uses a recently-developed comparative methodology to explore differences in their residential patterns between two modern (Chicago and New York) and two post-modern (Los Angeles and Miami) US cities, using data on the four main ethnic groups from the initial Census 2000 releases. It shows very clear differences between the two pairs, in the expected directions, but also differences within pairs - especially the two post-modern cities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)161-172
Number of pages12
JournalCities
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'From modern to post-modern? Contemporary ethnic residential segregation in four US metropolitan areas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this