From Tit-Bits to Big Brother

A century of audience participation in the media

Bridget Griffen-Foley*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores the connections between reality television and older print and electronic media formats. It surveys the history of audience participation in the media through a series of case studies drawn from Britain, Australia and the United States: periodicals featuring significant contributions from their readers in the 1880s; confessional magazines in the 1920s; mass-market women's magazines during the inter-war years; talkback radio since the 1960s; and the emergence of 'real life' media genres in the 1980s and 1990s. The article argues that media producers have, for more than a century, been blurring the notion of the passive media consumer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-548+570
Number of pages17
JournalMedia, Culture and Society
Volume26
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Confessional magazines
  • Media audiences
  • Reality television
  • Talkback radio
  • Women's magazines

Cite this