From vision to reality

Views of primary school principals on inclusive education in New South Wales, Australia

Linda J. Graham, Ilektra Spandagou

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper discusses the findings of a research study that used semi-structured interviews to explore the views of primary school principals on inclusive education in New South Wales, Australia. Content analysis of the transcript data indicates that principals' attitudes towards inclusive education and their success in engineering inclusive practices within their school are significantly affected by their own conception of what 'inclusion' means, as well as the characteristics of the school community, and the attitudes and capacity of staff. In what follows, we present two parallel conversations that arose from the interview data to illustrate the main conceptual divisions existing between our participants' conceptions of inclusion. First, we discuss the act of 'being inclusive,' which was perceived mainly as an issue of culture and pedagogy. Second, we consider the mechanics of 'including,' which reflected a more instrumentalist position based on perceptions of individual student deficit, the level of support they may require and the amount of funding they can attract.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)223-237
    Number of pages15
    JournalDisability and Society
    Volume26
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

    Keywords

    • Attitudes
    • Behaviour
    • Inclusion
    • Inclusive education
    • Primary schools
    • Principals
    • Social inclusion

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'From vision to reality: Views of primary school principals on inclusive education in New South Wales, Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this