Fun and feedback at the press of a button

Debbie Richards*, Catherine Braiding, Alan Vaughan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A common phenomenon across disciplines and universities is that students complain that they do not receive enough feedback, even when student evaluation forms indicate satisfaction in other areas such as teacher competency and enthusiasm. On the other side, but less considered, is the lack of feedback that teachers receive as they struggle to get students to participate and engage with the learning process. While technology does not offer an automatic solution, keypad-based automatic response systems do offer the potential to let both parties know how well the learning outcomes are being achieved in a timely and cost-effective manner. We have just completed two years of pilot trialling of such technology at our university in the Computing and Physics Departments. This paper reports our experiences together with the findings of others.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education: Who's Learning? Whose Technology?, ASCILITE 2006
EditorsLina Markauskaite, Peter Goodyear, Peter Reimann
Place of PublicationSydney
PublisherSydney University Press
Pages695-705
Number of pages11
Volume2
ISBN (Print)9781920898564
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education - "Who's Learning? Whose Technology?" - ASCILITE 2006 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 3 Dec 20066 Dec 2006

Other

Other23rd Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education - "Who's Learning? Whose Technology?" - ASCILITE 2006
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period3/12/066/12/06

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fun and feedback at the press of a button'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this