Functional movement screen pain location and impact on scoring have limited value for injury risk estimation in junior Australian football players

Joel T. Fuller, Matthew Lynagh, Brett Tarca, Andrew Zacharia, Alex Townsley, Cara Gleeson, Steve Milanese, Samuel Chalmers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective

To describe the location and severity of pain during Functional Movement Screen (FMS) testing in junior Australian football players and to investigate its effect on FMS composite score and injury risk. 

Design

Prospective cohort study. 

Methods

Junior male Australian football players (n = 439) completed preseason FMS testing. Pain location and severity (on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale [NPRS]) were assessed for painful subtests. The FMS composite score was calculated using 3 scoring approaches: “traditional,” a score of zero on painful subtests; “moderate,” a score of zero on painful subtests if an NPRS pain severity was greater than 4; and “raw,” did not adjust painful FMS subtest scores. Players were monitored throughout the competitive season and considered injured when 1 or more matches were missed due to injury. 

Results

One hundred seventy players reported pain during FMS testing. The pain-scoring approach affected mean composite score values (raw, 14.9; moderate, 14.5; traditional, 13.6; P<.001). Sixty-eight percent of pain was mildly severe (NPRS of 4 or less). Back pain (50%) was more common than upper-limb (24%) or lower-limb (26%) pain (P<.001). Upper-limb pain was associated with a small increase in injury risk (hazard ratio = 1.59, P = .023). No other FMS pain location influenced injury risk, nor did pain severity (P>.280). The FMS composite score was not associated with injury risk, regardless of pain-scoring approach (P≥.500). 

Conclusion

Pain was common during FMS testing in junior Australian football players and had a notable effect on the FMS composite score, but minimal effect on subsequent injury risk.

LanguageEnglish
Pages75-82
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Football
Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • athlete
  • risk
  • sport

Cite this

Fuller, Joel T. ; Lynagh, Matthew ; Tarca, Brett ; Zacharia, Andrew ; Townsley, Alex ; Gleeson, Cara ; Milanese, Steve ; Chalmers, Samuel. / Functional movement screen pain location and impact on scoring have limited value for injury risk estimation in junior Australian football players. In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 2019 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 75-82.
@article{5880f4898359400b9f76de68616f9646,
title = "Functional movement screen pain location and impact on scoring have limited value for injury risk estimation in junior Australian football players",
abstract = "ObjectiveTo describe the location and severity of pain during Functional Movement Screen (FMS) testing in junior Australian football players and to investigate its effect on FMS composite score and injury risk. DesignProspective cohort study. MethodsJunior male Australian football players (n = 439) completed preseason FMS testing. Pain location and severity (on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale [NPRS]) were assessed for painful subtests. The FMS composite score was calculated using 3 scoring approaches: “traditional,” a score of zero on painful subtests; “moderate,” a score of zero on painful subtests if an NPRS pain severity was greater than 4; and “raw,” did not adjust painful FMS subtest scores. Players were monitored throughout the competitive season and considered injured when 1 or more matches were missed due to injury. ResultsOne hundred seventy players reported pain during FMS testing. The pain-scoring approach affected mean composite score values (raw, 14.9; moderate, 14.5; traditional, 13.6; P<.001). Sixty-eight percent of pain was mildly severe (NPRS of 4 or less). Back pain (50{\%}) was more common than upper-limb (24{\%}) or lower-limb (26{\%}) pain (P<.001). Upper-limb pain was associated with a small increase in injury risk (hazard ratio = 1.59, P = .023). No other FMS pain location influenced injury risk, nor did pain severity (P>.280). The FMS composite score was not associated with injury risk, regardless of pain-scoring approach (P≥.500). ConclusionPain was common during FMS testing in junior Australian football players and had a notable effect on the FMS composite score, but minimal effect on subsequent injury risk.",
keywords = "adolescent, athlete, risk, sport",
author = "Fuller, {Joel T.} and Matthew Lynagh and Brett Tarca and Andrew Zacharia and Alex Townsley and Cara Gleeson and Steve Milanese and Samuel Chalmers",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "17",
doi = "10.2519/jospt.2020.9168",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "75--82",
journal = "Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy",
issn = "0190-6011",
publisher = "JOSPT",
number = "2",

}

Functional movement screen pain location and impact on scoring have limited value for injury risk estimation in junior Australian football players. / Fuller, Joel T.; Lynagh, Matthew; Tarca, Brett; Zacharia, Andrew; Townsley, Alex; Gleeson, Cara; Milanese, Steve; Chalmers, Samuel.

In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Vol. 50, No. 2, 17.09.2019, p. 75-82.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional movement screen pain location and impact on scoring have limited value for injury risk estimation in junior Australian football players

AU - Fuller, Joel T.

AU - Lynagh, Matthew

AU - Tarca, Brett

AU - Zacharia, Andrew

AU - Townsley, Alex

AU - Gleeson, Cara

AU - Milanese, Steve

AU - Chalmers, Samuel

PY - 2019/9/17

Y1 - 2019/9/17

N2 - ObjectiveTo describe the location and severity of pain during Functional Movement Screen (FMS) testing in junior Australian football players and to investigate its effect on FMS composite score and injury risk. DesignProspective cohort study. MethodsJunior male Australian football players (n = 439) completed preseason FMS testing. Pain location and severity (on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale [NPRS]) were assessed for painful subtests. The FMS composite score was calculated using 3 scoring approaches: “traditional,” a score of zero on painful subtests; “moderate,” a score of zero on painful subtests if an NPRS pain severity was greater than 4; and “raw,” did not adjust painful FMS subtest scores. Players were monitored throughout the competitive season and considered injured when 1 or more matches were missed due to injury. ResultsOne hundred seventy players reported pain during FMS testing. The pain-scoring approach affected mean composite score values (raw, 14.9; moderate, 14.5; traditional, 13.6; P<.001). Sixty-eight percent of pain was mildly severe (NPRS of 4 or less). Back pain (50%) was more common than upper-limb (24%) or lower-limb (26%) pain (P<.001). Upper-limb pain was associated with a small increase in injury risk (hazard ratio = 1.59, P = .023). No other FMS pain location influenced injury risk, nor did pain severity (P>.280). The FMS composite score was not associated with injury risk, regardless of pain-scoring approach (P≥.500). ConclusionPain was common during FMS testing in junior Australian football players and had a notable effect on the FMS composite score, but minimal effect on subsequent injury risk.

AB - ObjectiveTo describe the location and severity of pain during Functional Movement Screen (FMS) testing in junior Australian football players and to investigate its effect on FMS composite score and injury risk. DesignProspective cohort study. MethodsJunior male Australian football players (n = 439) completed preseason FMS testing. Pain location and severity (on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale [NPRS]) were assessed for painful subtests. The FMS composite score was calculated using 3 scoring approaches: “traditional,” a score of zero on painful subtests; “moderate,” a score of zero on painful subtests if an NPRS pain severity was greater than 4; and “raw,” did not adjust painful FMS subtest scores. Players were monitored throughout the competitive season and considered injured when 1 or more matches were missed due to injury. ResultsOne hundred seventy players reported pain during FMS testing. The pain-scoring approach affected mean composite score values (raw, 14.9; moderate, 14.5; traditional, 13.6; P<.001). Sixty-eight percent of pain was mildly severe (NPRS of 4 or less). Back pain (50%) was more common than upper-limb (24%) or lower-limb (26%) pain (P<.001). Upper-limb pain was associated with a small increase in injury risk (hazard ratio = 1.59, P = .023). No other FMS pain location influenced injury risk, nor did pain severity (P>.280). The FMS composite score was not associated with injury risk, regardless of pain-scoring approach (P≥.500). ConclusionPain was common during FMS testing in junior Australian football players and had a notable effect on the FMS composite score, but minimal effect on subsequent injury risk.

KW - adolescent

KW - athlete

KW - risk

KW - sport

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85078870205&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2519/jospt.2020.9168

DO - 10.2519/jospt.2020.9168

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 75

EP - 82

JO - Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

T2 - Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

JF - Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

SN - 0190-6011

IS - 2

ER -