Funding the national party: Changing geographies of local fund-raising for the British Conservative Party, 1984/85 to 1993/94

Charles Pattie*, Ron Johnston

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite growing evidence of the electoral importance of strong party organization at the constituency level in Great Britain, major political parties are facing growing difficulties in maintaining healthy grassroots organizations. In the early 1990s, the problem was particularly acute for the ruling Conservative Party. The Conservatives' local organizational problems coincided with concern over the health of party finance. Fund-raising by local Conservative Associations traditionally plays an important part in the party's financial affairs. However, analysis of the local fund-raising record shows a decline in local returns to the national party from the start of the 1990s. Whether as a result of grassroots decline or of local disaffection with the party's record in national government, the geography of local fund-raising reveals the largest declines to have been in areas where the party was strong. Closer inspection reveals dimensions of stability and change in the geography of local fund-raising efforts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)387-406
Number of pages20
JournalPolitical Geography
Volume16
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1997

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