Fungus-initiated catalytic reactions at hyphal-mineral interfaces drive iron redox cycling and biomineralization

Guang Hui Yu, Zhi Lai Chi, H. Henry Teng, Hai Liang Dong, Andreas Kappler, Michael R. Gillings, Matthew L. Polizzotto, Cong Qiang Liu, Yong Guan Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The ability of fungi to weather a wide range of minerals influences plant nutrition and enhances global biogeochemical cycles of life-essential elements. The fungus-mineral interface plays a key role in weathering, but the specific mechanisms underlying these processes remain poorly understood. Here, we examined fungal-mineral weathering using hematite and Trichoderma guizhouense. We showed that hematite dissolution increased over cultivation time, with the formation of secondary minerals up to ∼3000 µm−2 at the interfaces after 66 h cultivation. Of the hematite associated with hyphae, approximately 15% was converted to the secondary mineral ferrihydrite. Importantly, superoxide radicals were detected at the hyphal tips and along the whole hyphae. During cultivation, a high concentration (∼1000 nM) of hydroxyl radical was also detected. Synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopies at fungus-mineral interfaces suggest that fungus hyphae alter the local redox state of iron and thus are redox-active. These findings indicate that fungus-initiated catalytic reactions occur at hyphal-mineral interfaces, in view of the fact that superoxide does not diffuse far from the site of formation. Furthermore, these results also suggest that the catalytic reactions may serve as a new strategy for microbial iron uptake. Together, these findings constitute a significant step forward in understanding the ways that fungi make minerals available to biological systems.

LanguageEnglish
Pages192-203
Number of pages12
JournalGeochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Volume260
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Biomineralization
biomineralization
Fungi
Minerals
Iron
fungus
iron
mineral
hematite
secondary mineral
weathering
Weathering
Superoxides
ferrihydrite
biogeochemical cycle
hydroxyl radical
Oxidation-Reduction
nutrition
Biological systems
Nutrition

Keywords

  • biocatalysis
  • fungi weathering
  • interfacial process
  • mineral dissolution
  • superoxides
  • synchrotron radiation

Cite this

Yu, Guang Hui ; Chi, Zhi Lai ; Teng, H. Henry ; Dong, Hai Liang ; Kappler, Andreas ; Gillings, Michael R. ; Polizzotto, Matthew L. ; Liu, Cong Qiang ; Zhu, Yong Guan. / Fungus-initiated catalytic reactions at hyphal-mineral interfaces drive iron redox cycling and biomineralization. In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta. 2019 ; Vol. 260. pp. 192-203.
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Fungus-initiated catalytic reactions at hyphal-mineral interfaces drive iron redox cycling and biomineralization. / Yu, Guang Hui; Chi, Zhi Lai; Teng, H. Henry; Dong, Hai Liang; Kappler, Andreas; Gillings, Michael R.; Polizzotto, Matthew L.; Liu, Cong Qiang; Zhu, Yong Guan.

In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Vol. 260, 01.09.2019, p. 192-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Yu, Guang Hui

AU - Chi, Zhi Lai

AU - Teng, H. Henry

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AU - Kappler, Andreas

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