GaSb quantum dots and its microanalysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

Ari Handono Ramelan*, Pepen Arifin, Ewa Goldys

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Nanostructures have become a topic of increasing interest due to their fundamental properties and possible device applications. One method of fabrication that is receiving much attention lately is the utilization of the coherent Stranski-Krastanov mode which leads to self-assembly of small-scale islands, driven by the lattice mismatch between the quantum dot material and the underlying substrate material [1-5]. W e quantitatively investigate initial stages of growth and evolution of GaSb islands on GaAs substrates grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We pay particular attention to the transition from 2D to 3D growth and to the transition between isolated island growth and the coalescence of islands in an effort to improve our understanding of this regime. The extent of oxidation and growth derived oxygen contamination for GaSb quantum dots grown by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) were also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using a system with high energy resolution.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICONN 2010 - Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
EditorsAndrew Dzurak
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages84-86
Number of pages3
ISBN (Print)9781424452620
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event2010 3rd International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ICONN - 2010 - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 22 Feb 201026 Feb 2010

Other

Other2010 3rd International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, ICONN - 2010
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period22/02/1026/02/10

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