Gender differences in allied health students’ knowledge of disabled women and men

Mary T. Westbrook, Barbara J. Adamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Disabled women experience greater handicaps than disabled men do. A survey of 907 students in six allied health professions indicated that the majority lacked knowledge of 13 sex differences in frequency of occurrence of physical disabilities and handicaps. Female students revealed greater unawareness. Students who recognized sex differences in frequency of disabilities were more likely to correctly identify predominantly male disabilities but tended to incorrectly attribute predominantly female disabilities to men. This trend was stronger among male subjects. Beliefs regarding sex differences in handicaps suggest that disabled men are perceived as coping more effectively with disability. Results are a matter of concern given that health practitioners’ knowledge and expectations influence rehabilitation outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-110
Number of pages18
JournalWomen and Health
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jan 1990
Externally publishedYes

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