General self-efficacy and psychological resilience promote skill acquisition rate under psychological pressure

Monique F. Crane*, Gareth Brabazon, Daniel F. Gucciardi, Thomas Loveday, Mark Wiggins

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study extends the limited body of research exploring the association between psychological resources and performance under pressure. It was anticipated that participants’ general self-efficacy and resilience would positively influence skill acquisition rate more under high pressure, than low pressure. Eighty-one undergraduate students (M age = 22.93; SD = 7.53; 50.6% female) participated in a learning task: to fly a flight simulator. The within-subjects variable was the participant's ability to steadily control the aircraft roll across six trials. Psychological pressure was manipulated between-subjects and general self-efficacy and resilience were measured moderator variables. Findings indicated that under high pressure, higher levels of general self-efficacy and perceived resilience predicted faster initial skill acquisition compared to those with lower levels of these resources. In contrast, in the low-pressure condition, the skill acquisition rate was the same irrespective of psychological resources. This research highlights the importance of psychological resources in pressured training contexts.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere3
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalAustralasian Journal of Organisational Psychology
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • employee performance
  • mental health
  • stress and burnout
  • training
  • industrial and organisational psychology

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