Geochemical fingerprint of hyaloclasts in glassy fragmental rocks of Macquarie Island (Southern Ocean): implications for volcanogenic sedimentary processes at a waning mid-ocean ridge

N. R. Daczko, N. Harb, R. A. Portner, J. A. Dickinson

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    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Two main types of glassy fragmental rocks formed along the Proto-Macquarie Spreading Ridge: (i) hyaloclastite breccia; and (ii) pillow-fragment breccia. Examples now exposed on Macquarie Island, Southern Ocean, were largely sourced from proximal pillow lavas. In each of seven samples examined, hyaloclasts (basaltic glass grains) have a narrow major- and trace-element geochemical range, consistent with derivation of each sample from a single volcanic eruption event. Moreover, every sample analysed within the one stratigraphic section (at three sites) displays distinctive major- and trace-element geochemistry compared with the other two sections. This suggests that hyaloclasts at each site represent discrete magma batches. A single source for these glassy fragmental rocks contrasts with the dominant fault-scarp-derived polymict sedimentary rocks on Macquarie Island. We suggest that the hyaloclasts analysed in this study were deposited in small basins between the slopes of growing pillow cones along the mid-ocean ridge. The geochemical analyses presented here encompass (weakly) fractionated (e.g. Bauer Bay) to near-primitive (e.g. Pyramid Peak) compositions. All samples presented here lie within the range of the enriched- to normal-MORB suites previously reported for the island that include the least fractionated MORB melts known globally. The interpretation of geochemically distinct magma batches over the small area of the island suggests very limited magma mixing consistent with an immature or waning magmatic system. We relate these geochemical characteristics to: (i) volcanism near a very long offset transform; and (ii) genesis of magmas during the waning stages of slow seafloor spreading within a very narrow (<50 km-wide) spreading corridor.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)951-963
    Number of pages13
    JournalAustralian Journal of Earth Sciences
    Volume56
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

    Keywords

    • Australia–Pacific plate boundary
    • geochemistry
    • glass
    • Macquarie Island
    • MORB
    • provenance

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