Geographic and religious trends in the pre-Islamic religious beliefs of the North Arabian nomadic and semi-nomadic tribes

Cassandra Bennett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper focuses on the evidence for religious practices and beliefs of the nomadic tribes of pre-Islamic North Arabia, in order to detect the relationship between trends in religious beliefs and their geographical spread. Analyses presented rely on the large amount of data from the corpus of Safaitic epigraphic material produced throughout northern Arabia from approximately the second century BC to the fourth century AD. The results show the spatial relationships between the deities worshipped in these inscriptions and their geographical spread, as well as the emergence of influences of religious worship driven by proximity to dominant surrounding cultures. The results also show the make-up of religious formulae in the existence of prayers and curses, and an analysis of important deities and their functions through the religious practices of pre-Islamic tribes.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherArchaeopress
Pages43-51
Number of pages9
Volume44
ISBN (Print)9781905739806
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventSeminar for Arabian Studies (47th : 2013) - London
Duration: 26 Jul 201328 Jul 2013

Seminar

SeminarSeminar for Arabian Studies (47th : 2013)
CityLondon
Period26/07/1328/07/13

Keywords

  • Bedouin
  • North Arabian religion
  • Pre-Islamic
  • Safaitic
  • Tribal religion

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