Globalizing higher education policy practice: internationalizing education through learning transformations in knowledge construction

Michael Singh*, Tonia Gray, Timothy Hall, Greg Downey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter raises provocative ideas, moving briskly through them inviting engagement in further research and teaching in local/global education policy practice. A new generation of local/global education is warranted if higher education academics and students are to explore the deep fractures in the politics and the economics that are dividing nations, internally and externally. University students (and academics) now live in a world where authoritarianism is on the rise as public faith in democracy declines, environmental degradation and policy dilemmas increase, and racism furthers these crises. These crises are integral to the increasing disconnection between economic growth and real material improvements in their own work/life trajectories. The nature of these challenges is such that making an intergenerational shift in local/global education is now necessary.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe globalisation of higher education
Subtitle of host publicationdeveloping internationalised education research and practice
EditorsTimothy Hall, Tonia Gray, Gregory Downey, Michael Singh
Place of PublicationCham, Switzerland
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages445-460
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9783319745794
ISBN (Print)9783319745787
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • International Education
  • tertiary education
  • English-only monolingualism
  • knowledge production
  • learning transformations
  • local/global education
  • mobility education
  • monitory democracy
  • multilingual students
  • work-integrated service learning

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