Gold nanoparticle aggregation as a probe of antifreeze (glyco) protein-inspired ice recrystallization inhibition and identification of new IRI active macromolecules

Daniel E. Mitchell, Thomas Congdon, Alison Rodger, Matthew I. Gibson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Antifreeze (glyco)proteins are found in polar fish species and act to slow the rate of growth of ice crystals; a property known as ice recrystallization inhibition. The ability to slow ice growth is of huge technological importance especially in the cryopreservation of donor cells and tissue, but native antifreeze proteins are often not suitable, nor easily available. Therefore, the search for new materials that mimic this function is important, but currently limited by the low-throughout assays associated with the antifreeze properties. Here 30 nm gold nanoparticles are demonstrated to be useful colorimetric probes for ice recrystallization inhibition, giving a visible optical response and is compatible with 96 well plates for high-throughout studies. This method is faster, requires less infrastructure, and has easier interpretation than the currently used "splat" methods. Using this method, a series of serum proteins were identified to have weak, but specific ice recrystallization inhibition activity, which was removed upon denaturation. It is hoped that high-throughput tools such as this will accelerate the discovery of new antifreeze mimics.

Original languageEnglish
Article number15716
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalScientific Reports
Volume5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Gold nanoparticle aggregation as a probe of antifreeze (glyco) protein-inspired ice recrystallization inhibition and identification of new IRI active macromolecules'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this