Government procurement contracts and minimum labour standards enforcement

rhetoric, duplication and distraction?

Sasha Holley, Glenda Maconachie, Miles Goodwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Government contracts for services typically include terms requiring contractors to comply with minimum labour standards laws. Procurement contract clauses specify reporting procedures and sanctions for non-compliance, implying that government contracting agencies will monitor and enforce minimum labour standards within contract performance management. In this article, the case of school cleaners employed under New South Wales government contracts between 2010 and 2011 is the vehicle for exploring the effectiveness of these protective clauses. We find that the inclusion of these protective clauses in procurement contracts is unnecessary in the Australian context, and any expectations that government contracting agencies will monitor and enforce labour standards are misleading. At best, the clauses are rhetoric, and at worst, they are a distraction for parties with enforcement powers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-59
Number of pages17
JournalEconomic and Labour Relations Review
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Cleaners
  • enforcement
  • government procurement contracts
  • minimum labour standards

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Government procurement contracts and minimum labour standards enforcement: rhetoric, duplication and distraction?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this