Health and social support services in older adults recently discharged from hospital: service utilisation and costs and exploration of the impact of a home-exercise intervention

I. Farag, K. Howard, S. O'Rourke, M. L. Ferreira, S. R. Lord, J. C T Close, C. Vogler, C. M. Dean, R. G. Cumming, C. Sherrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Admission to hospital can lead to persistent deterioration in physical functioning, particularly for the more vulnerable older population. As a result of this physical deterioration, older people who have been recently discharged from hospital may be particularly high users of health and social support services. Quantify usage and costs of services in older adults after hospitalisation and explore the impact of a home-exercise intervention on service usage.

Method: The present study was a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial (ACTRN12607000563460). The trial involved 340 participants aged 60 years and over with recent hospitalisation. Service use and costs were compared between intervention (12 months of home-exercise prescribed in 10 visits from a physiotherapist) and control groups.

Results: 33 % of participants were re-admitted to hospital, 100 % consulted a General Medical Practitioner and 63 % used social services. 56 % of costs were associated with hospital admission and 22 % with social services. There was reduction in General Medical Practitioner services provided in the home in the intervention group (IRR 0.23, CI 0.1 to 0.545, p <0.01) but no significant between-group difference in service use or in costs for other service categories.

Conclusion: There appears to be substantial hospital and social service use and costs in this population of older people. No significant impact of a home-based exercise program was evident on service use or costs.

LanguageEnglish
Article number82
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Social Work
Social Support
Exercise
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
General Practitioners
Hospitalization
Physical Therapists
Vulnerable Populations
Randomized Controlled Trials
Control Groups
Population

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Hospitalisation
  • Older people
  • Resource use
  • Costs
  • Mobility improvement

Cite this

Farag, I. ; Howard, K. ; O'Rourke, S. ; Ferreira, M. L. ; Lord, S. R. ; Close, J. C T ; Vogler, C. ; Dean, C. M. ; Cumming, R. G. ; Sherrington, C. / Health and social support services in older adults recently discharged from hospital : service utilisation and costs and exploration of the impact of a home-exercise intervention. In: BMC Geriatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 16. pp. 1-7.
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Health and social support services in older adults recently discharged from hospital : service utilisation and costs and exploration of the impact of a home-exercise intervention. / Farag, I.; Howard, K.; O'Rourke, S.; Ferreira, M. L.; Lord, S. R.; Close, J. C T; Vogler, C.; Dean, C. M.; Cumming, R. G.; Sherrington, C.

In: BMC Geriatrics, Vol. 16, 82, 18.04.2016, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Farag, I.

AU - Howard, K.

AU - O'Rourke, S.

AU - Ferreira, M. L.

AU - Lord, S. R.

AU - Close, J. C T

AU - Vogler, C.

AU - Dean, C. M.

AU - Cumming, R. G.

AU - Sherrington, C.

N1 - Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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Y1 - 2016/4/18

N2 - Background: Admission to hospital can lead to persistent deterioration in physical functioning, particularly for the more vulnerable older population. As a result of this physical deterioration, older people who have been recently discharged from hospital may be particularly high users of health and social support services. Quantify usage and costs of services in older adults after hospitalisation and explore the impact of a home-exercise intervention on service usage.Method: The present study was a secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial (ACTRN12607000563460). The trial involved 340 participants aged 60 years and over with recent hospitalisation. Service use and costs were compared between intervention (12 months of home-exercise prescribed in 10 visits from a physiotherapist) and control groups.Results: 33 % of participants were re-admitted to hospital, 100 % consulted a General Medical Practitioner and 63 % used social services. 56 % of costs were associated with hospital admission and 22 % with social services. There was reduction in General Medical Practitioner services provided in the home in the intervention group (IRR 0.23, CI 0.1 to 0.545, p <0.01) but no significant between-group difference in service use or in costs for other service categories.Conclusion: There appears to be substantial hospital and social service use and costs in this population of older people. No significant impact of a home-based exercise program was evident on service use or costs.

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