Hearing loss and a supportive tactile signal in a navigation system: Effects on driving behavior and eye movements

Birgitta Thorslund, Björn Peters, Nicholas Herbert, Kenneth Holmqvist, Björn Lidestam, Alexander Black, Björn Lyxell

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    5 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    An on-road study was conducted to evaluate a complementary tactile navigation signal on driving behaviour and eye movements for drivers with hearing loss (HL) compared to drivers with normal hearing (NH). 32 participants (16 HL and 16 NH) performed two preprogrammed navigation tasks. In one, participants received only visual information, while the other also included a vibration in the seat to guide them in the correct direction. SMI glasses were used for eye tracking, recording the point of gaze within the scene. Analysis was performed on predefined regions. A questionnaire examined participant's experience of the navigation systems. Hearing loss was associated with lower speed, higher satisfaction with the tactile signal and more glances in the rear view mirror. Additionally, tactile support led to less time spent viewing the navigation display.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number1
    Pages (from-to)1-9
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Eye Movement Research
    Volume6
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2013. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

    Keywords

    • Driving behavior
    • Eye movements
    • Hearing loss
    • Navigation system
    • Tactile support

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