Hearing voices in the resting brain: a review of intrinsic functional connectivity research on auditory verbal hallucinations

Ben Alderson-Day*, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Charles Fernyhough

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    78 Citations (Scopus)
    15 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are thought to reflect the intrinsic functional connectivity of brain regions. Alterations to RSNs have been proposed to underpin various kinds of psychopathology, including the occurrence of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH). This review outlines the main hypotheses linking AVH and the resting state, and assesses the evidence for alterations to intrinsic connectivity provided by studies of resting fMRI in AVH. The influence of hallucinations during data acquisition, medication confounds, and movement are also considered. Despite a large variety of analytic methods and designs being deployed, it is possible to conclude that resting connectivity in the left temporal lobe in general and left superior temporal gyrus in particular are disrupted in AVH. There is also preliminary evidence of atypical connectivity in the default mode network and its interaction with other RSNs. Recommendations for future research include the adoption of a common analysis protocol to allow for more overlapping datasets and replication of intrinsic functional connectivity alterations.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)78-87
    Number of pages10
    JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
    Volume55
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2015

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright the Author(s) 2015. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

    Keywords

    • Default mode network
    • Inner speech
    • Resting state
    • Schizophrenia
    • Voice-hearing

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hearing voices in the resting brain: a review of intrinsic functional connectivity research on auditory verbal hallucinations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this