Hedonic and sensory characteristics of odors conditioned by pairing with tastants in humans

Martin R. Yeomans*, Sirous Mobini, Toby D. Elliman, Helen C. Walker, Richard J. Stevenson

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    82 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Animals readily acquire positive odor-taste hedonic associations, but evidence for this in humans remains weak and was explored further. Retronasal pairing of odors with sucrose or salty stimuli (Experiment 1) increased the rated sweetness of sucrose-paired odors without altering liking, although changes in odor pleasantness correlated with sucrose liking. Experience of odors with sucrose or quinine by sweet likers (Experiment 2) found increased pleasantness and sweetness for sucrose-paired odors, whereas quinine-paired odors became less liked and more bitter. Odor-sucrose pairings in sweet likers and dislikers (Experiment 3) found increased sweetness in both groups but increased odor liking only in likers. These data suggest that evaluative and sensory learning are dissociable and that evaluative changes are sensitive to individual differences in sweet liking.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)215-228
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes
    Volume32
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006

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