High possum mortality on urban roads

Implications for the population viability of the common brushtail and the common ringtail possum

Tracey C. Russell, Catherine A. Herbert, James L. Kohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animalvehicle collisions impact wildlife populations and in the northern suburbs of Sydney, both the common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) and the common ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus) are killed in large numbers. Over a two-year period almost 600 road-killed possums were observed from 217 road surveys covering over 7800km, equating to 5.45 possums per week over the 36-km study area. Surveys were conducted along roads where the environment ranged from low-rise suburban to continuous sclerophyll forest. Significantly more ringtail possums were observed as road-kill, outnumbering brushtail possums by almost three to one. No sex bias was found amongst road-killed ringtail possums; however, seasonal trends and weight fluctuations were significant, with both males and females being at their lowest weights during the autumn breeding season. For brushtail possums a bias towards young males was observed. Sex and weight of road-killed brushtail possums were comparable to live-trap data from a previous study in the same location. In areas of such high possum mortality, wildlife managers may need to take action to mitigate possum road-kill.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-397
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Zoology
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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