High sitting time or obesity: which came first? Bidirectional association in a longitudinal study of 31,787 Australian adults

Zeljko Pedisic*, Anne Grunseit, Ding Ding, Josephine Y. Chau, Emily Banks, Emmanuel Stamatakis, Bin B. Jalaludin, Adrian E. Bauman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: Evidence on the direction of the association between sitting time and obesity is limited. The prospective associations between baseline total sitting time and subsequent changes in body mass index (BMI), and baseline BMI and subsequent changes in sitting time were examined. Methods: BMI, from self-reported height and weight, and a single-item measure of sitting time were ascertained at two time points (3.4 ± 0.96 years apart) in a prospective questionnaire-based cohort of 31,787 Australians aged 45-65 years without severe physical limitations. Results: In a fully adjusted model, baseline obesity was associated with increased sitting time among all participants (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.20 [95% CI, 1.11-1.30]; P < 0.001) and in most subgroups. The association was significant among those who were sitting <4 hours/day (aOR = 1.24 [95% CI, 1.07-1.44]; P = 0.004) and 4-8 hours/day at baseline (aOR=1.18 [95% CI, 1.06-1.32]; P = 0.003), but not in the high sitting groups (P = 0.111 and 0.188 for 8-11 and ≥11 sitting hours/day, respectively). Nonsignificant and inconsistent results were observed for the association between baseline sitting time and subsequent change in BMI. Conclusions: Our findings support the hypothesis that obesity may lead to a subsequent increase in total sitting time, but the association in the other direction is unclear.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2126-2130
Number of pages5
JournalObesity
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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