Higher systolic blood pressure in early-mid adulthood is associated with poorer cognitive performance in those with a dominantly inherited Alzheimer's disease mutation but not in non-carriers. Results from the DIAN study

Ying Xu, Htein Linn Aung, Randall J. Bateman, William S. Brooks, Jasmeer Chhatwal, Gregory S. Day, Anne M. Fagan, Martin R. Farlow, Brian Gordon, Patrick G. Kehoe, Johannes Levin, Hiroshi Mori, John C. Morris, Whitney Wharton, Peter Humburg, Peter R. Schofield, Ruth Peters*, Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN)

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is a longitudinal observational study that collects data on cognition, blood pressure (BP), and other variables from autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (MCs) and non-carrier (NC) family members in early to mid-adulthood, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate BP and cognition relationships in these populations. METHOD: We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between systolic and diastolic BP and cognition in DIAN MC and NC. RESULTS: Data were available from 528 participants, who had a mean age of 38 (SD = 11) and were 42% male and 61% MCs, at a median follow-up of 2 years. Linear-multilevel models found only cross-sectional associations in the MC group between higher systolic BP and poorer performance on language (β = −0.181 [−0.318, −0.044]), episodic memory (−0.212 [−0.375, −0.049]), and a composite cognitive measure (−0.146 [−0.276, −0.015]). In NCs, the relationship was cross-sectional only and present for language alone. DISCUSSION: Higher systolic BP was cross-sectionally but not longitudinally associated with poorer cognition, particularly in MCs. BP may influence cognition gradually, but further longitudinal research is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4999-5009
Number of pages11
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume19
Issue number11
Early online date23 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2023. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease
  • blood pressure
  • cognition

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