Hip fracture and the influence of dementia on health outcomes and access to hospital-based rehabilitation for older individuals

Rebecca Mitchell*, Lara Harvey, Henry Brodaty, Brian Draper, Jacqueline Close

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: For older individuals who sustain a hip fracture, the presence of dementia can influence their access to hospital-based rehabilitation. Purpose: This study compares the characteristics and health outcomes of individuals with and without dementia following a hip fracture; and access to, and outcomes following, hospital-based rehabilitation in a population-based cohort. Method: An examination of hip fractures involving individuals aged 65 years and older with and without dementia using linked hospitalisation, rehabilitation and mortality records during 2009–2013. Results: There were 8785 individuals with and 23 520 individuals without dementia who sustained a hip fracture. Individuals with dementia had a higher age-adjusted 30-d mortality rate compared to individuals without dementia (11.7% versus 5.7%), a lower proportion of age-adjusted 28-d re-admission (17.3% versus 24.4%) and a longer age-adjusted mean length of stay (22.2 versus 21.9 d). Compared to individuals without dementia, individuals with dementia had 4.3 times (95% CI: 3.90–4.78) lower odds of receiving hospital-based rehabilitation. However, when they did receive rehabilitation they achieved significant motor functional gain at discharge compared to admission using the Functional Independence Measure, but to a lesser extent than individuals without dementia. Conclusion: Within a population-based cohort, older individuals with dementia can benefit from access to, and participation in, rehabilitation activities following a hip fracture. This will ensure that they have the best chance of returning to their pre-fracture physical function and mobility.Implications for Rehabilitation Older individuals with dementia can benefit from rehabilitation activities following a hip fracture. Early mobilisation of individuals post-hip fracture surgery, where possible, is advised. Further work is needed on how best to work with individuals with dementia after a hip fracture in residential aged care to maximise any potential functional gains.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2286-2295
Number of pages10
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume38
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Nov 2016

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • hip fracture
  • hospitalisation
  • older adults

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