Hip joint contact forces increase in response to greater body-borne loads and faster walking speeds

Gavin K. Lenton, Tim L. A. Doyle, David G. Lloyd, Claudio Pizzolato, David J. Saxby

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Soldiers perform physically demanding tasks that predispose them to elevated risk of musculoskeletal injury (MSKI). Understanding joint loading during commonly performed tasks, e.g., load carriage, may improve MSKI prevention efforts, yet current research is limited. Using EMG-informed neuromusculoskeletal (NMSK) models, we analyzed hip contact forces (HCF) from 20 soldier participants as they carried two different loads and walked at two different speeds. Increases in HCF were observed from both increases in carried load and walking speed, with HCF magnitudes approaching values observed during running. Importantly, muscles accounted for >50% of the total HCF and this contribution remained consistent with increasing task demands. Thus, our results suggest the effectiveness of injury prevention strategies should be analyzed using NMSK modeling approaches that incorporate estimates of muscle forces.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1047
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2019
EventXXVII Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics - Calgary, Canada
Duration: 31 Jul 20194 Aug 2019
Conference number: XXVII
https://www.isb2019.com/

Conference

ConferenceXXVII Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics
Abbreviated titleISB/ASB 2019
CountryCanada
CityCalgary
Period31/07/194/08/19
Internet address

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hip joint contact forces increase in response to greater body-borne loads and faster walking speeds'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this