Home-range studies in a reintroduced brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata) population in the Grampians National Park, Victoria

Jenny Molyneux*, David A. Taggart, Anthony Corrigan, Sean Frey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2008, after 9 years of presumed local extinction, brush-tailed rock-wallabies (Petrogale penicillata) were reintroduced at Moora Moora Creek in the Grampians National Park, western Victoria. Since little is known about this species in Victoria, the reintroduction presented an important opportunity to gain information on the species' ecology. Radio-tracking was undertaken and home range determined for three individuals released 11 months before this study and a further five individuals that were released at the commencement of the study in October 2009. Home-range size showed little variation amongst individuals, with a mean overall home range of 26ha (±1.69, s.e.) and a mean core home range of 2.5ha (±0.24, s.e.). Newly reintroduced individuals showed higher levels of association with wallabies from the same release and greater site fidelity when known conspecifics were close. Within 5 months of release, newly reintroduced animals showed home ranges similar in both size and distribution to those of animals released 11 months prior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Mammalogy
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • activity patterns
  • macropodid
  • marsupial
  • radio-tracking
  • social organisation

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