Households’ experience of local government during recovery from cyclones in coastal Bangladesh: resilience, equity, and corruption

Rabiul Islam*, Greg Walkerden, Marco Amati

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Households’ links with local Government provide important support for disaster resilience and recovery on the Bangladeshi coast. Few previous studies of disaster resilience and recovery have explored how linking social networks—and in particular local government—contribute. Using household surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews, we examine strengths and weaknesses of local government’s contribution, using two cyclone-affected coastal villages as case studies. The findings show that local government provides important support, for example relief distribution, livelihood assistance, and reconstruction of major community services. However, patronage relationships (notably favouring political supporters) and bribery play a substantial role in how those responsibilities are discharged. The equity and efficiency of these contributions to recovery are markedly diminished by corruption. Reducing corruption in UP’s contributions to disaster recovery could significantly improve resilience; however, general reform of governance in Bangladesh would needed to bring this about.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)361-378
Number of pages18
JournalNatural Hazards
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • Bangladeshi coast
  • Corruption
  • Cyclone Sidr
  • Disaster resilience and recovery
  • Local government
  • Social capital
  • Union Parishad

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