Housing experience and settlement satisfaction: Recent Chinese, Indian and South African skilled immigrants to New Zealand

Ron J. Johnston*, A. D. Trlin, A. M. Henderson, N. H. North, M. J. Skinner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relatively little work has been done on the housing experience of recent migrants from cultural backgrounds different to that of their host society. This absence is particularly marked for relatively high socio-economic status skilled migrants, many of whom have to negotiate housing markets significantly different from those in their countries of origin. Data obtained from a panel study of recent immigrants from three separate sources - China, India and South Africa - to New Zealand's main cities (primarily Auckland) are used to explore the nature of their housing experiences. Over a four-year period these migrants moved towards the New Zealand norm of owner occupied, detached dwellings, although more rapidly in some cases than others; the pace of movement reflected not only cultural differences among the three groups, relative to the New Zealand norms, but also experiences in the labour market. These differences are reflected in levels of satisfaction with the decision to move to New Zealand.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)401-421
Number of pages21
JournalHousing Studies
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2005

Keywords

  • Housing
  • Migrants
  • New Zealand

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Housing experience and settlement satisfaction: Recent Chinese, Indian and South African skilled immigrants to New Zealand'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this