How Do Teachers Learn to Manage Classroom Behaviour? A study of teachers' opinions about their initial training with special reference to classroom behaviour management

Frank Merrett, Kevin Wheldall*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Structured interviews were carried out with 176 secondary school teachers to elicit their views/opinions about their initial professional training and their later practical experience, with particular reference to classroom behaviour management. The results showed that the vast majority of teachers believe classroom management skills to be of major importance to them professionally. Nearly three-quarters of them were dissatisfied with the preparation in this area of professional skills provided by their initial training courses. Many thought that their colleagues spent too much time on matters of order and control and 38% thought that they, themselves, did also. Generally, they showed an interest in attending training courses in classroom behaviour management. Many felt that such training could reduce stress among teachers and might help to reduce troublesome behaviour among their pupils. Nearly all of them thought that it would be of benefit to their younger colleagues who were just beginning their careers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-106
Number of pages16
JournalEducational Studies
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1993

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