How do tempo and pitch shifts of soundtracks for roleplaying games influence memory of facts conveyed in virtual-immersive environments?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

In this paper we discuss potential effects of background music on the perception and memory of events experienced in virtual-immersive environments and computer-based roleplaying games. We describe an empirical study of whether memory for factual information is influenced by changes in the pitch and/or tempo of soundtracks used for a computer supported presentation on the history of the Macquarie lighthouse. The study involves presenting participants with a computer-generated educational 3D animation, while exposing different groups of participants to soundtracks that vary in pitch height (high, medium, low version) and tempo (fast, medium, and slow versions). Memory for factual information will then be examined, and implications discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Inaugural International Conference on Music Communication Science (ICoMCS)
EditorsEmery Schubert, Kym Buckley, Rosemary Eliott, Brooke Koboroff, Johnson Chen, Catherine Stevens
Place of PublicationUniversity of Western Sydney, Australia
PublisherARC Research Network in Human Communication Science (HCSNet)
Pages42-45
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781741081619
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventInternational Conference on Music Communication Science (1st : 2007) - Sydney
Duration: 5 Dec 20077 Dec 2007

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Music Communication Science (1st : 2007)
CitySydney
Period5/12/077/12/07

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How do tempo and pitch shifts of soundtracks for roleplaying games influence memory of facts conveyed in virtual-immersive environments?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Fassbender, E., Richards, D., & Thompson, W. F. (2007). How do tempo and pitch shifts of soundtracks for roleplaying games influence memory of facts conveyed in virtual-immersive environments? In E. Schubert, K. Buckley, R. Eliott, B. Koboroff, J. Chen, & C. Stevens (Eds.), Proceedings of the Inaugural International Conference on Music Communication Science (ICoMCS) (pp. 42-45). University of Western Sydney, Australia: ARC Research Network in Human Communication Science (HCSNet).