How editors read: an eye-tracking study of the effects of professional editorial experience and task instruction on reading behaviour

Melanie Law, Haidee Kruger

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    The focus of this exploratory study is the relationship between the predictor variables of editorial experience and task instruction, and reading behaviour. Professional editors and non-editors read two texts for two different purposes (reading for comprehension and reading in preparation of editing) while their eye movements were recorded. The participants' overall reading behaviour and their reading behaviour around errors in the texts were analysed across the two reading tasks using several eye-tracking measures. The data were analysed using linear mixed-effects modelling. Our findings suggest that task instruction and editorial experience interact to have a strong effect on temporal eye movements. The findings further suggest the development of highly automated reading and processing strategies for editors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationInnovation and expansion in translation process research
    EditorsIsabel Lacruz , Riitta Jääskeläinen
    Place of PublicationAmsterdam
    PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
    Chapter11
    Pages241–265
    Number of pages25
    ISBN (Electronic)9789027264756
    ISBN (Print) 9789027231956
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2018

    Publication series

    NameAmerican Translators Association scholarly monograph series
    VolumeXVIII
    ISSN (Print)0890-4111

    Keywords

    • editorial experience
    • task instruction
    • cognitive processing
    • reading strategies
    • eye tracking

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