L'occupation humaine dans le delta du Nil aux Ve et IVe millénaires: approche géoarchéologique à partir de la région de Samara (delta oriental)

Translated title of the contribution: Human occupation in the Nile Delta during the 5th and 4th millenium BCE: geoarchaeological approach from the region of Samara (Eastern Nile Delta)

Research output: Book/ReportBookpeer-review

Abstract

The Nile Delta was born from both its long geological history and its shorter human one, from the first agricultural communities up to present times during which Man arranged and modelled the landscape. In such a mobile environment, human occupation during the Predynastic and the Early Dynastic period (5th and 4th millennia BC) is considered in the context of natural phenomena which allowed the anthropisation of the territory, but which also erased any trace of the settlements over the last centuries. Habitable areas are very rare in the Nile Delta. Using a case study carried out in the Samara area, more particularly on the Kôm el-Khilgan archaeological site, we propose an analysis of a gezira site, the most common kind of settlement in Lower Egypt. It opens up new perspectives for the space analysis of the sites, considering the questions related to the supply of raw materials, the integration of the localities in different hierarchical networks and the place the sites occupied in the exchanges with the neighbouring areas and in the first Egyptian trade.
Translated title of the contributionHuman occupation in the Nile Delta during the 5th and 4th millenium BCE: geoarchaeological approach from the region of Samara (Eastern Nile Delta)
Original languageFrench
Place of PublicationCairo
PublisherInstitut Francais d’archeologie orientale
Number of pages337
ISBN (Print)9782724707427
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameBibliothèque d'étude
PublisherInstitut français d'archéologie orientale
No.174

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