Humiliation, resistance and state violence: using the sociology of emotions to understand institutional violence against women and girls and their acts of resistance

Toby Fattore, Jan Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between state violence in the form of practices aimed to humiliate and acts of resistance to these practices. Focusing on the experiences of women and girls in the Parramatta Female Factory (1804–1848), Parramatta Girls’ Training School and Hay Institution for Girls (1950–1974), we suggest that the practices used to govern women and girls can be read as attempts at humiliation—to degrade and denounce an individual’s entire subjectivity as being unworthy. We argue that while shame can be the basis for reintegration, humiliation leads to other responses, including at an individual level, reclaiming one’s status as being of worth, and at the level of social action through movements that reclaim group status and invert the direction of who has morally transgressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-117
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2020. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Humiliation
  • Parramatta Female Factory
  • Parramatta Girls Training School
  • Social movements
  • Sociology of emotions

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