Hyper-selectivity of immigrants and generational differences in occupational status: Evidence for Asian groups in Australia

Sheruni De Alwis*, Nick Parr, Fei Guo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the occupational status of immigrant birthplace-generation groups in Australia, a country which emphasises skills in immigrant admissions. Using 2016 data, the occupational statuses of the first, 1.5, and second generations of Australia's China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Vietnam birthplace-generation groups are compared to those for the main English-speaking countries, all other countries, and third- and above-generation Australians. The results show that the occupational status of the 1.5- and second-generation Asian groups considered generally exceed that for their first generation counterparts and invariably exceed that for third- and above-generation Australians, even after controlling for a range of confounding factors. For most Asian groups, the 1.5 generation's occupational status exceeds that of the second generation. Modification of the ‘segmented assimilation’ hypothesis to incorporate a new category of ‘hyper-selective differentiation’ is proposed to capture the extraordinary upward occupational mobility of most 1.5- and second-generation Asian groups in Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2494
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalPopulation, Space and Place
Volume28
Issue number1
Early online date14 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • hyper-selectivity
  • immigrant
  • labour market outcomes
  • occupational mobility
  • occupational status
  • second generation

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