“I want my children to become global citizens”: the role of a heritage language in appreciation of citizenship status in young Korean Australian children and their parents

Sun Jung Joo*, Alice Chik, Emilia Djonov

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
51 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Increasing globalisation has spurred a flow of migrants worldwide. These movements include exchanges of migrants’ linguistic repertoires across regions, transforming the ways in which they define themselves in a multilingual society. Unlike identity categories such as ethnic identity, the contested concept of citizenship identity has remained underexplored in heritage language (HL) research. Focusing on Korean migrant families in Australia, this study extends the limited knowledge about the roles of citizenship in HL maintenance across different generations. Specifically, drawing on interviews with six Korean-speaking parents and their children, this study compares the ways in which migrant parents and their primary and secondary school-aged children relate a HL to their citizenship status. Thematic analysis reveals that while HL-speaking children tend to associate their language with national or ethnic identities, migrant parents aremore likely to identify their children as global citizens whose HL competencies are essential for their future career and economic advantage. The study contributes to scholarship at the intersection of HL, citizenship, and globalisation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164–185
Number of pages22
JournalAustralian Review of Applied Linguistics
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2023

Keywords

  • heritage language
  • migrant children
  • citizenship identity
  • global citizenship

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