"I want sausages for my lunch!" Using functional communication training to enhance choice making behaviour

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

In a remote village in Negara Brunei Darussalam, a young boy with autism was exhibiting behaviours of concern at lunchtime. This paper describes the process by which the school-based team addressed this situation using prompting as a teaching strategy. An initial junctional analysis indicated that the boy was taking other children's food at lunchtime and that this behaviour was maintained by his peers' compliance. The communicative functions of the child's prelinguistic behaviours were assessed by teacher and parent interview and by direct observation. An intervention using a verbal prompting strategy and functional communication training (FCT) via a simple A-B time series design was designed. Preliminary results indicate that, with training in FCT, a regular class teacher who previously had limited experience with children with special needs was able to interpret a child's behaviour as communicative. This information was then used to design a communication behaviour intervention that was later used to enhance the child's communication skills by teaching a replacement behaviour to the child.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational research in teacher education
Subtitle of host publicationcurrent perspectives
EditorsWarren Halloway, John Maurer
Place of PublicationArmidale, NSW
PublisherKardooair Press
Pages335-348
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9780908244805
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
EventAnnual Seminar of the International Society for Teacher Education (28th : 2008) - Armidale, NSW
Duration: 20 Apr 200825 Apr 2008

Seminar

SeminarAnnual Seminar of the International Society for Teacher Education (28th : 2008)
CityArmidale, NSW
Period20/04/0825/04/08

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