Identity centrality moderates the relationship between acceptance of group-based stressors and well-being

Monique Frances Crane, Winnifred Louis, Jacqueline K. Phillips, Catherine Amiot, Niklas Steffens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
150 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Two two-wave studies were used to examine the proposition that identity centrality enhances the effectiveness of stressor acceptance in the face of group-based stressors. Study 1 was conducted in newly commencing psychology students (N = 154). Stressor intensity, psychology student identity centrality, and attempted stressor acceptance were measured at two-time points over 6-weeks. Study 2 was conducted in a group of early to late career veterinarians (N = 92) and extended Study 1 by assessing stressor frequency as an indicator of the level of demand. Veterinarian identity centrality and stressor acceptance were measured twice over 12-months. Both studies provided support for the predicted three-way interaction. Only when Time 1 stressors and identity centrality were both high was stressor acceptance related to a reduction in perceived stressor intensity (Study 1) or burnout symptoms (Study 2) at Time 2. These findings suggest that identity centrality enhances the effectiveness of stressor acceptance for supporting wellbeing and resilience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)866-882
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume48
Issue number6
Early online date19 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Keywords

  • resilience
  • stressor acceptance
  • social identity
  • burnout
  • coping

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