Imagine that: elevated sensory strength of mental imagery in individuals with Parkinson’s disease and visual hallucinations

James M. Shine*, Rebecca Keogh, Claire O’Callaghan, Alana J. Muller, Simon J. G. Lewis, Joel Pearson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visual hallucinations occur when our conscious experience does not accurately reflect external reality. However, these dissociations also regularly occur when we imagine the world around us in the absence of visual stimulation. We used two novel behavioural paradigms to objectively measure visual hallucinations and voluntary mental imagery in 19 individuals with Parkinson's disease (ten with visual hallucinations; nine without) and ten healthy, age-matched controls. We then used this behavioural overlap to interrogate the connectivity both within and between the major attentional control networks using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with visual hallucinations had elevated mental imagery strength compared with patients without hallucinations and controls. Specifically, the sensory strength of imagery predicted the frequency of visual hallucinations. Together, hallucinations and mental imagery predicted multiple abnormalities in functional connectivity both within and between the attentional control networks, as measured with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the two phenomena were also dissociable at the neural level, with both mental imagery and visual misperceptions associated with specific abnormalities in attentional network connectivity. Our results provide the first evidence of both the shared and unique neural correlates of these two similar, yet distinct phenomena.
Original languageEnglish
Article number20142047
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume282
Issue number1798
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • visual hallucinations
  • mental imagery
  • bistable perception
  • resting-state functional connectivity
  • attentional networks

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Imagine that: elevated sensory strength of mental imagery in individuals with Parkinson’s disease and visual hallucinations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this