Imine reductases: A comparison of glutamate dehydrogenase to ketimine reductases in the brain

André Hallen, Joanne F. Jamie, Arthur J L Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A key intermediate in the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)-catalyzed reaction is an imine. Mechanistically, therefore, GDH exhibits similarities to the ketimine reductases. In the current review, we briefly discuss (a) the metabolic importance of the GDH reaction in liver and brain, (b) the mechanistic similarities between GDH and the ketimine reductases, (c) the metabolic importance of the brain ketimine reductases, and (d) the neurochemical consequences of defective ketimine reductases. Our review contains many historical references to the early work on amino acid metabolism. This work tends to be overlooked nowadays, but is crucial for a contemporary understanding of the central importance of ketimines in nitrogen and intermediary metabolism. The ketimine reductases are important enzymes linking nitrogen flow among several key amino acids, yet have been little studied. The cerebral importance of the ketimine reductases is an area of biomedical research that deserves far more attention.

LanguageEnglish
Pages527-541
Number of pages15
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014

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Glutamate Dehydrogenase
Imines
Brain
Oxidoreductases
Metabolism
Nitrogen
Amino Acids
Liver
ketimine reductase
Biomedical Research
Enzymes

Cite this

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Imine reductases : A comparison of glutamate dehydrogenase to ketimine reductases in the brain. / Hallen, André; Jamie, Joanne F.; Cooper, Arthur J L.

In: Neurochemical Research, Vol. 39, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 527-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

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