Impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 on aleurone cells and starch granule morphology in domesticated and wild rices

Sayedur Rahman, Les Copeland, Brian J. Atwell, Thomas H. Roberts*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Wild rice species represent valuable germplasm for breeding of elite genotypes with enhanced resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, differences in endosperm morphology between wild and cultivated rice, and how these are affected by enhanced levels of atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) predicted for later this century, are largely unknown. Accessions of native rice species from northern Australia, Oryza australiensis and O. meridionalis, and a local cultivar, O. sativa cv. Doongara, were grown to maturity in glasshouses at ambient (aCO2, 400 ppm) and eCO2 (700 ppm). Endosperm morphology was studied from transverse sections of mature grains using scanning electron microscopy. Aleurone cell length and width were higher in eCO2 than in aCO2 in the O. meridionalis accession Howard Springs, but lower in Doongara. The average starch granule size in Doongara was greater than in the wild genotypes in both CO2 treatments. The area and length of the starch granule images were larger in eCO2 than in aCO2 in the O. meridionalis accession Cape York but smaller in Doongara. Responses of rice endosperm morphology to eCO2 were dependent on genotype. We conclude that endosperm morphology responds differentially to eCO2, both between and within rice species. Contrasts in these responses can be exploited by breeders.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number103389
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Cereal Science
    Volume103
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

    Keywords

    • Aleurone
    • Elevated CO
    • Oryza australiensis
    • Oryza meridionalis
    • Starch granule

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