Impact of Parental Discipline Methods on the Child's Internalization of Values: A Reconceptualization of Current Points of View

Joan E. Grusec*, Jacqueline J. Goodnow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

937 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is generally argued that parental use of specific discipline techniques (e.g., reasoning vs. power assertion) differentially affects a child's internalization. This article offers an expanded formulation. Internalization as a result of discipline is proposed to be based on a child's accurate perception of the parental message and acceptance or rejection of it. Mechanisms promoting acceptance are perceptions of the parent's actions as appropriate, motivation to accept the parental position, and perception that a value has been self-generated. Features of the misdeed, discipline technique, child, and parent that affect accurate perception and acceptance-rejection are outlined. Other goals besides internalization, such as movement beyond the parent's position, maintenance of the child's self-esteem, and maintenance of the parent-child relationship, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-19
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume30
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1994

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