Impact of rumination versus distraction on anxiety and maladaptive self-beliefs in socially anxious individuals

Quincy J J Wong, Michelle L. Moulds*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A large body of experimental evidence has demonstrated the adverse effects of rumination on depressive mood and cognitions. In contrast, while prominent models of social phobia (Clark & Wells, 1995; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997) have proposed rumination as a key maintaining factor, the effects of rumination in social anxiety have not been extensively explored. In a sample of (N = 93) undergraduates, this study investigated the impact of rumination versus distraction following a social-evaluative task on anxiety and another key component of social phobia: maladaptive self-beliefs. Relative to distraction, rumination maintained anxiety in both high and low socially anxious individuals, and maintained unconditional beliefs in high socially anxious individuals. The results support models of social phobia and also suggest important theoretical extensions. Implications for the treatment of social anxiety are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-867
Number of pages7
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Rumination
  • Social anxiety

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of rumination versus distraction on anxiety and maladaptive self-beliefs in socially anxious individuals'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this