Improving outcomes from high-risk surgery: a multimethod evaluation of a patient-centred advanced care planning intervention

Amanda Selwood, Siva Senthuran, Brette Blakely, Paul Lane, John North, Robyn Clay-Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Patients who are frail, have multiple comorbidities or have a terminal illness often have poor outcomes from surgery. However, sole specialists may recommend surgery in these patients without consultation with other treating clinicians or allowing for patient goals. The Patient-Centred Advanced Care Planning (PC-ACP) model of care provides a framework in which a multidisciplinary advanced care plan is devised to incorporate high-risk patients' values and goals. Decision-making is performed collaboratively by patients, their family, surgeons, anaesthetists, intensivists and surgical case managers. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of this new model of care, and to determine potential benefits to patients and clinicians.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: After being assessed for frailty, patients will complete a patient-clinician information engagement survey pretreatment and at 6 months follow-up. Patients (and/or family members) will be interviewed about their experience of care pretreatment and at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. Clinicians will complete a survey on workplace attitudes and engagement both preimplementation and postimplementation of PC-ACP and be interviewed, following each survey, on the implementation of PC-ACP. We will use process mapping to map the patient journey through the surgical care pathway to determine areas of improvement and to identify variations in patient experience.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received ethical approval from Townsville Hospital and Health Service HREC (HREC/16/QTHS/100). Results will be communicated to the participating hospital, presented at conferences and submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed MEDLINE-indexed journal.

LanguageEnglish
Article numbere014906
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2017

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Patient-Centered Care
MEDLINE
Workplace
Health Services
Publications
Comorbidity
Decision Making
Referral and Consultation

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2017. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this

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title = "Improving outcomes from high-risk surgery: a multimethod evaluation of a patient-centred advanced care planning intervention",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Patients who are frail, have multiple comorbidities or have a terminal illness often have poor outcomes from surgery. However, sole specialists may recommend surgery in these patients without consultation with other treating clinicians or allowing for patient goals. The Patient-Centred Advanced Care Planning (PC-ACP) model of care provides a framework in which a multidisciplinary advanced care plan is devised to incorporate high-risk patients' values and goals. Decision-making is performed collaboratively by patients, their family, surgeons, anaesthetists, intensivists and surgical case managers. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of this new model of care, and to determine potential benefits to patients and clinicians.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: After being assessed for frailty, patients will complete a patient-clinician information engagement survey pretreatment and at 6 months follow-up. Patients (and/or family members) will be interviewed about their experience of care pretreatment and at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. Clinicians will complete a survey on workplace attitudes and engagement both preimplementation and postimplementation of PC-ACP and be interviewed, following each survey, on the implementation of PC-ACP. We will use process mapping to map the patient journey through the surgical care pathway to determine areas of improvement and to identify variations in patient experience.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received ethical approval from Townsville Hospital and Health Service HREC (HREC/16/QTHS/100). Results will be communicated to the participating hospital, presented at conferences and submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed MEDLINE-indexed journal.",
author = "Amanda Selwood and Siva Senthuran and Brette Blakely and Paul Lane and John North and Robyn Clay-Williams",
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Improving outcomes from high-risk surgery : a multimethod evaluation of a patient-centred advanced care planning intervention. / Selwood, Amanda; Senthuran, Siva; Blakely, Brette; Lane, Paul; North, John; Clay-Williams, Robyn.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 7, No. 2, e014906, 27.02.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Senthuran, Siva

AU - Blakely, Brette

AU - Lane, Paul

AU - North, John

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N2 - INTRODUCTION: Patients who are frail, have multiple comorbidities or have a terminal illness often have poor outcomes from surgery. However, sole specialists may recommend surgery in these patients without consultation with other treating clinicians or allowing for patient goals. The Patient-Centred Advanced Care Planning (PC-ACP) model of care provides a framework in which a multidisciplinary advanced care plan is devised to incorporate high-risk patients' values and goals. Decision-making is performed collaboratively by patients, their family, surgeons, anaesthetists, intensivists and surgical case managers. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of this new model of care, and to determine potential benefits to patients and clinicians.METHODS AND ANALYSIS: After being assessed for frailty, patients will complete a patient-clinician information engagement survey pretreatment and at 6 months follow-up. Patients (and/or family members) will be interviewed about their experience of care pretreatment and at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. Clinicians will complete a survey on workplace attitudes and engagement both preimplementation and postimplementation of PC-ACP and be interviewed, following each survey, on the implementation of PC-ACP. We will use process mapping to map the patient journey through the surgical care pathway to determine areas of improvement and to identify variations in patient experience.ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received ethical approval from Townsville Hospital and Health Service HREC (HREC/16/QTHS/100). Results will be communicated to the participating hospital, presented at conferences and submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed MEDLINE-indexed journal.

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