Improving the computational thinking pedagogical capabilities of school teachers

Matt Bower, Leigh N. Wood, Jennifer W.M. Lai, Cathie Howe, Raymond Lister, Raina Mason, Kate Highfield, Jennifer Veal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The idea of computational thinking as skills and universal competence which every child should possess emerged last decade and has been gaining traction ever since. This raises a number of questions, including how to integrate computational thinking into the curriculum, whether teachers have computational thinking pedagogical capabilities to teach children, and the important professional development and training areas for teachers. The aim of this paper is to address the strategic issues by illustrating a series of computational thinking workshops for Foundation to Year 8 teachers held at an Australian university. Data indicated that teachers' computational thinking understanding, pedagogical capabilities, technological know-how and confidence can be improved in a relatively short period of time through targeted professional learning.

LanguageEnglish
Pages53-72
Number of pages20
JournalAustralian Journal of Teacher Education
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Bower, Matt ; Wood, Leigh N. ; Lai, Jennifer W.M. ; Howe, Cathie ; Lister, Raymond ; Mason, Raina ; Highfield, Kate ; Veal, Jennifer. / Improving the computational thinking pedagogical capabilities of school teachers. In: Australian Journal of Teacher Education. 2017 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 53-72.
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Improving the computational thinking pedagogical capabilities of school teachers. / Bower, Matt; Wood, Leigh N.; Lai, Jennifer W.M.; Howe, Cathie; Lister, Raymond; Mason, Raina; Highfield, Kate; Veal, Jennifer.

In: Australian Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 42, No. 3, 2017, p. 53-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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