IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF COMMUNITY HEALTH SURVEYS AND COMMUNITY HEALTH PROMOTION CAMPAIGNS BY FEEDBACK FROM THE COMMUNITY

EXPERIENCE FROM THE WALLSEND COMMUNITY AND HEALTH PROJECT

Rufus M. Clarke*, Gwen Allen, Sue McBay, Sandra Heaney

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A lifestyle and health risk survey was conducted in two socially disadvantaged Collector's Districts, as the basis for a health promotion intervention in one of the Districts. After community input into the planning, and local advance publicity, 395 people responded to the survey (a response rate of 39%). Three sources of community feedback were used: (i) reasons for refusal to participate; (ii) written comments solicited at a two‐month follow‐up; (iii) later, in‐depth interviews with a subset of respondents. The data from this feedback related both to the process and outcomes of the survey; the latter included increased personal and community awareness of health, as well as lifestyle changes. The data are discussed in terms of their representativeness and the factors influencing participation, the implications of the low response rate, the stages of health behaviour change, and the potential conflict between scientific and human value‐systems in community research. 1990 Public Health Association of Australia

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Health Studies
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF COMMUNITY HEALTH SURVEYS AND COMMUNITY HEALTH PROMOTION CAMPAIGNS BY FEEDBACK FROM THE COMMUNITY: EXPERIENCE FROM THE WALLSEND COMMUNITY AND HEALTH PROJECT'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this