Improving the safety and quality of end‐of‐life in an Australian private hospital setting: an audit of documented end‐of‐life care

Rosemary Saunders, Karla Seaman, Courtney Glass, Karen Gullick, Julie Andrew, Ashwini Davray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study reviewed the audit outcomes of the documented end-of-life care in a private hospital against the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care's five recommended processes of care (Essential Elements (EE) 1-5).

Methods: A retrospective database review of deaths over a three-year period was undertaken. This was followed by a sequential medical record audit (n = 100) to evaluate the end-of-life care documented in the three days preceding death.

Results: There were 997 deaths from 2015 to 2017. The audit found communication to family the patient was dying (91%) and to the patient (36%) (EE1); evidence of specialist referral (68%) (EE2); assessment of the ability to eat/drink in the last 72 hours (86%) (EE3); advance care directives (13%) and hospital resuscitation plans (92%) (EE4); and response to patient or family concerns (100%) (EE5).

Conclusions: Components of the processes of care of the Essential Elements need to be addressed to improve patient-centred communication and shared decision-making.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Early online date3 Aug 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Aug 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • communication
  • end- of- life care
  • hospitals
  • terminal care
  • end-of-life care

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