Improving the transition from medical school to internship - evaluation of a preparation for internship course

Helen A. Scicluna*, Michael C. Grimm, Philip D. Jones, Louis S. Pilotto, H. Patrick McNeil

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)
56 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: This study evaluates the impact of a new 'Preparation for Internship' (PRINT) course, which was developed to facilitate the transition of University of New South Wales (UNSW) medical graduates from Medical School to Internship. Methods. During a period of major curricular reform, the 2007 (old program) and 2009 (new program) cohorts of UNSW final year students completed the Clinical Capability Questionnaire (CCQ) prior to and after undertaking the PRINT course. Clinical supervisors' ratings and self-ratings of UNSW 2009 medical graduates were obtained from the Hospital-based Prevocational Progress Review Form. Results: Prior to PRINT, students from both cohorts perceived they had good clinical skills, with lower ratings for capability in procedural skills, operational management, and administrative tasks. After completing PRINT, students from both cohorts perceived significant improvement in their capability in procedural skills, operational management, and administrative tasks. Although PRINT also improved student-perceived capability in confidence, interpersonal skills and collaboration in both cohorts, curriculum reform to a new outcomes-based program was far more influential in improving self-perceptions in these facets of preparedness for hospital practice than PRINT. Conclusions: The PRINT course was most effective in improving students' perceptions of their capability in procedural skills, operational management and administrative tasks, indicating that student-to-intern transition courses should be clinically orientated, address relevant skills, use experiential learning, and focus on practical tasks. Other aspects that are important in preparation of medical students for hospital practice cannot be addressed in a PRINT course, but major improvements are achievable by program-wide curriculum reform.

Original languageEnglish
Article number23
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2014. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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