Inaugural KS Inglis address: making Australian media history

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Abstract

This address considers the development of media history as a field of research in Australia. It takes the form of a historiographical excursion, beginning with a focus on the press, and then extending to broadcasting, and touching on the work of KS Inglis as a through line. After considering what I identify as a historiographical blossoming since the 1980s, I extend my gaze to the tools and institutions for media history that have emerged, including online resources, a conference series and a research centre. Finally, I use my own 1990s research into the Packer empire to illustrate how some of the techniques for doing media history have changed in the past 20 years. In doing so, I reflect on both the benefits, and the limitations, of digital tools and techniques for Australian media historians.

LanguageEnglish
Pages3-21
Number of pages19
JournalMedia International Australia
Volume170
Issue number1
Early online date12 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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Inaugural KS Inglis address : making Australian media history. / Griffen-Foley, Bridget.

In: Media International Australia, Vol. 170, No. 1, 02.2019, p. 3-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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