Increasing frequency of tuberculosis among staff in a South African district hospital: impact of the HIV epidemic on the supply side of health care

David Wilkinson*, Charles F. Gilks

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To describe the changing frequency of tuberculosis among staff in a South African hospital, and to compare incidence in health workers with that in ancillary staff, the number and type of cases of tuberculosis among staff diagnosed between 1991 and 1996 were ascertained. The incidence rate of tuberculosis among health workers and ancillary staff was compared with the age-specific rate in the community (20-59 years old). In 1991-1992, 2 cases of tuberculosis were diagnosed among hospital staff; but in 1993-1996 there were 20 cases diagnosed (annualized incidence rates 138/100,000 and 690/100,000; P < 0.0001). Of 14 cases rested (64%), 12 (86%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Most cases (82%) successfully completed treatment, but 4 died (18%). The incidence of tuberculosis amongst health workers (558/100,000 person-years of observation [PYO]) and ancillary staff (445/100,000 PYO) was not significantly different (P = 0.7), but it was lower than the incidence rate among ((20-59 years old people in the community (1543/100,000). Tuberculosis has increased amongst hospital staff, secondary to the impact of HIV. The HIV epidemic is having a substantial impact on the health of hospital staff and interventions to counter this are urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)500-502
Number of pages3
JournalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume92
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acquired immune deficiency syndrome
  • Hospital staff
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Incidence
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • South Africa
  • Tuberculosis

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