Indigenous geographies I: Mere resource conflicts? The complexities in Indigenous land and environmental claims

Brad Coombes*, Jay T. Johnson, Richard Howitt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Indigenous peoples live in challenging environments and engage in complex negotiations to access their rights. Yet research on their social mobilization often stereotypes them as victims of environmental management. We review three debates through which human geographers are beginning to engage more meaningfully with Indigenous environmentalism: the political ecology of neoliberalism; deliberation within claims settlement; and propertization of socio-ecological relations. A movement away from conflating Indigenous with local is evident in those debates, producing recognition of diversity in Indigenous motivations but also a range of challenges to geographical practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)810-821
Number of pages12
JournalProgress in Human Geography
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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